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PICTURES OR MEMORIES - Do you have anything you would like to share?
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Courtesy of
The late Ruth Fisher
©

The Swan Inn just before it was demolished in 1932

 

Courtesy of
Colin & Janice Smith
©

Another pictire of the Mattishall Swan - The sign over the doors says Charles Kiddle - Charles was Landlord from November 22nd 1907 to Febrary 12th 1909.

 

Courtesy of
The late Russell Smith
©

Another view of the crossroads - The Post Office is on the corner and the old malting's is in the process of being demolished on the right. The children are standing outside what used to be Mattishall's wooden village hall it was called 'Odd Fellows Hall'. The sign over the door says 'The Electric Cinema.' From about 1916 to 1927 it was used two days a week for the visiting shows of Gordon Arthur Fickling from Ovington. He was a farmers son who was hooked by the magic of movies. The road was still a dirt track. The picture was taken about 1921.

 
This picture was taken from a newspaper cutting so sadly we don't have the original, however it still gives a good image. From the arched doorway we can tell it is the house just right of London House Store.
In the first years of the 1900's Frank Norton had a hardware store there. In those days this house was part of a row of terrace houses in between the shop and the old Swan public house before it was demolished. A sign above the door advertisers new and secondhand furniture. When London House Stores became available Frank moved premises as we will see in the pictures below.

Courtesy of
Neville Frewer
©

Another view taken outside the Swan looking down Dereham Road. London House Stores is the shop displaying wall signs, at that time it was owned by Mr Frank Norton who also sold cycles

 

Courtesy of
Neville Frewer
©

A closer shot of the above where quite a few bikes are up for sale. The school doorway can just be seen through the trees.

 

Courtesy of
Karen Bash
©

A longer shot of the same view about 1920. Notice the boys gathering and sitting on the church wall, probably waiting for the group of young girls coming up the road. Not to many cars then!
Madge Earl is the young girl in the dark hat leaning on the rail outside the Swan, her sister Joan is with her and the lady is their mother Alice May Earl nee Taylor. Alice married Fred Bartram Earl in June quarter of 1914, apart from their two daughters they had a son Charlie. Fred was Landlord of the Swan from November 27th 1914 till his death in 1942. Alice took over as Landlady on April 10th 1942 to October 6th 1950. During their tenancy the old building was demolished and replace with the new one pictured below. Alice May Earl died in 1982 at East Dereham age 90.
Madge Earl married Russell Smith and it is thanks to Russell that we have quite a lot of pictures of Mattishall which are featured on these pages.

 

Courtesy of
The late Russell Smith
©

Taken from the church tower gives a good view of the newly built Swan Public House as well as Odd Fellows Hall. The Hall was used for all the village meetings, there were whist drives and dances, the music was supplied by Mr. Ladbroke, he played his dulcimer, Mrs. Ladbroke played the piano. They lived at Hockering and travelled by motor bike and side-car. The side-car would be a bit overcrowded as Mrs. Ladbroke sat in the side-car with the dulcimer, and then daughter Ula on the back. Ula later married Ted Youngs and had a son Brian who lived on the corner of Back and Burgh Lane where Ula and Ted lived all their lives. During the Second World War the Americans from Weston Airfield used to cycle to the hall to attend the dances which were then held each Saturday night and were always very well attended. There was also concert parties who visited the village quite regularly, Harry Lambert, Norman Abbott and Les Everitt came with the ‘Odds and Ends’ concert party from Dereham, (they always sang ‘Delia’ as part of the programme). Another member of the party was Harry Faux and his Chalks (he had a big blackboard with sheets hanging over the back and he would do quick sketches, then bring another sheet over) and Buster Newell, a postman was the comedian. Mr. Lambert owned a furniture store in Dereham and he and his wife together with others used to entertain the surrounding villages. There was also an entertainment group know as ‘Values Concert Party’ who consisted of father, mother, daughter and son-in-law. They were called the ‘Values’ because the father’s name was Valentine Hughes. They would put on three or four shows a week, all different. Mrs. Hughes was the pianist and after the entertainment the chairs were cleared away and there would be a dance. Magicians and Old Time music acts used to visit and the entrance charge was a silver threepenny piece. The hall was later sold to St. Johns despite the village committee putting in an offer of £600.00 to buy it. The hall was demolished in the mid 1970s and a private house now stands on the site.

 

Courtesy of
Karen Bash
©

London House Stores sometime after 1904 - Widow Mrs Elizabeth Irwin George who was born at Combe Martin, Devon is in the middle with her daughter Florence Elizabeth who was born at Mile End London on the right. The young girl is unknown. Mr Robert Frederic George (a Norwich man) had died in 1904 aged 73. He had been found by his wife at the back of the property, head down in a barrell of water, the Corner's Verdict, deceased drowned himself in a tub of water whilst temporally insane.
The address was then 12 Church Square and we assume it was the Georges who named the property London House. Shortly after the above picture was taken Mrs George sold up after living there for 15 years and moved to 212 Ardgowen Road Catford, London where we find her in 1911.

 

Courtesy of
Gary Creelman
©

The shop was then purchased by Frank Norton, a Mattishall man as seen in the picture above and his wife Lilian Barstow nee Utley who was from Liverpool. They had married in 1906. The address was then London House Stores, Church Square. Frank was born in the Dec quarter of 1875 at Mattishall the son of Clement Norton (1842) a Master Baker of Church Square and Rachel Browne. Below there is a later picture - in those days the village shop sold virtually everything. Frank was brother to William (Billy) Browne Norton (1871) who had a Bakers shop on Dereham Road West, near the Ringers public house.
Frank was Deacon, Sunday School Assistant, Superintendent at the Old Moor Chapel on Badley Moor. He died in 1934 on September 30th age 59 and was buried in Mattishall Cemetery on October 3rd. Lilian died in 1947 age 81 and was buried with Frank on April 25th 1947. They had no children.

 

Courtesy of
Karen Bash
©

A much later shot from a different angle. At the end of the building we can just see Mattishall's first petrol pump it has a white glass doom on top. It has also been said that Mrs Norton always had the kettle on for those who were often affectionately called 'Gentlemen of the Road' or 'Milestone Inspectors' simply meaning 'Tramps'. They were men that had fallen on hard times (homeless ex-servicemen etc). There were many workhouses throughout Norfolk where they would stay for one or two days at a time. Gressenhall was the nearest to us and often these men would stop at Mattishall where Mrs Norton would give them some hot water for their billy-can as well as some bread and cheese. There was a clay pit in the village beside the main road and it was a favorite stop for the chaps in the winter to light a fire and have their rations, warm up and perhaps a sleep before moving on to Gressenhall.

 

Courtesy of
Iris Coe
©

1910 Coronation - The sign on the left says "God Save The King" - Mattishall Old Vicarage House is a Grade 2 listed building dating from early 18th century with an early 19th century facade. It is brick with rendered facade and pantile roof. 2 storeys with attic.

 

Courtesy of
The late Ruth Fisher
©

A few years later two more garages would become established in Mattishall. This one is next door to what is now the Post Office. Sadly this is only a photocopy of the original so it is very grainy however we can see it employed several staff . It was also the place to recharge electrical accumulators. These were energy storage devices (lead–acid battery) which accepts energy, stores energy, and releases energy as needed often used in the first wireless radio's.
The Ladies are: Edna Cole, Kathleen Hipperson, Mrs Grief and Marjorie Footer.

 

Courtesy of
Dennis Gaskin
©

A much later picture, about sometime in the 1970's, Grief's buildings are still there and the Post Office is clearly recognisable.

 

Courtesy of
Jim Waddilove
©

The building was later demolished and this more modern garage and forecourt was erected. It was owned by Jim Waddilove who on retirement sold the plot for building some time in the late 1990's. The site is now private homes.

 

Courtesy of
Neville Frewer
©

The Mattishall first School built in 1872 - For more infromation on our First School click HERE

 

Courtesy of
The late Russell Smith
©

Norfolk House about 1920. In 1930 it was bought together with field behind it by Arthur Edward Horne. The field stretched down Dereham Road to just past what is now the Middle School entrance. It was the base for his building bussiness A. E. Horne & Sons. Out of sight and to the right of the picture was a 'Chapel of Rest'. Arthur was also the village undertaker helped by his two sons Stephen and Russell.

 

Courtesy of
Russell William Horne
©

Arthur with his pony and Hearse, many local people made their last journey in this way.

 

Courtesy of
Russell William Horne
©

Things were different then, coffins were handmade on the premises or outside in the sunlight if it was a nice day. Arthur and his son Russell would carry out the carpentry and Mrs Elsie Horne nee Fisher and her daughters would then line the coffin and crochet the lace trims to go round the top.

 

Courtesy of
Rosemary Molony
©

In this picture we can see the school on the left, it has the portable swimming pool open for use so it would imply it was in the summer of 1965 which is the date on the back. Norfolk House is in the middle and to its rear is Arthur Horne & Sons building yard. The site in now occupied by a nursing home and sadly the school has gone. At the bottom of the picture are some sheds and a telephone box. Right at the top of the picture is a pond where in 1937 a young schoolboy called Eric J. Clarke age 7 tragically drowned. Eric had wondered off at playtime with some of his friends. Frantic efforts were made by Miss Coats swimming around the pond in her petticoat and by the village policeman who failed to remove his wristwatch before going into the water. The body was eventually moved on the back of a coal lorry.

 

Courtesy of
Nevill Frewer
©

This picture shows the Methodist Church and a row of cottages now known as Sunnyside. The church was built in 1900 by builder Lebbell King for the price of £700. Mr King was born at Swanton Morley but lived most of his life in Mattishall at The Almonds on South Green, he was one of the Mattishall builders as well as being an undertaker and local Methodist Preacher. The church was built on the frontage of the decommissioned Duke of Edinburgh Public House. Steward & Pattison had sold the property to Mr William Horne (1832) who was a grocer on the corner of Welgate just past where Mattishall News is today. William had the old pub converted into his private home were he lived with his wife Sarah nee Godfrey and his two daughters, Emily Rosa (1851) and Jemima Emma (1858). He sold the frontage to the Methodists for £80. William Horne's daughter Emily would later live in the cottages. She gave the land between the cottages and the church to the Methodists so a stable could be built for the visiting preachers. The stable is now the Church Meeting Rooms. Emily also had a drapery shop further down the road just past Mattishall News which can be seen in later pictures.

 

Courtesy of
Frances McPherson nee Horne
©

Another shot of the Methodist Church this time looking east up Dereham Road. It was taken before the road was surfaced which was in the early 1930's. Below is a closer shot of the little thatched cottage which was on the opposite side of the road to the church.

 

Ray Taylor ©

This little cottage was demolished wsometime after the road was widened and surfaced about 1947. The front door opened onto the main road and apparently there was a stone raised step to allow the surface water to run in the gutter below. 'Keyhole Godfrey' lived there he was a shoemaker, he got his name due to the fact that he was always looking through the front door keyhole to try and catch the children who would often knock on his door and run off. The keys were much bigger in those days so he was able to get a good view. Not sure if he was ever up to catching them though!

Memory: - The old cottage stood empty for some years - One Sunday morning toward the end of the Second World War a Civil Defense exercise took place in it. Looking across the road from our house 'Sunnyside' I could see a lot of smoke coming out of windows and doors, it was not on fire it was just thick smoke. I was allowed to go onto the road as far as the Methodist steps. Several people were by this time watching and quite a few other official personal were taking part. There was great excitement as two stretches appeared coming out of the gable-end bedroom window. They were lowered with ropes to the ground supported by a ladder which had been placed under the window sill. On each stretcher were two volunteers, Derek Green and Colin Blanch. As one reached the ground the patient raised his bandaged hand then pulling aside the bandages covering his face he gave a big smile to the nurses. I could see clearly that it was Derek - Jerry Hipperson

 

Courtesy of
The late Ruth Fisher
©

This lady is standing in front of the gates of the cottages now known as Sunnyside, we have no idea who she is. However there are only a few ladies this could be and as she is wearing a wedding ring I wonder if it is Mrs Sarah Horne nee Godfrey. She was living at the old Duke of Edinburgh pub in the late 1890's. Fashions have changed a bit! Any ideas?

 
This pictures shows a row of cottages which have been converted to one house and now known as Sunnyside. This row of cottages was the home of William Horne born in East Dereham in 1801. William was a tailor by trade and moved to Mattishall sometime about 1826. William had married Mary Ann Mann from Swanton Morley and they had four children, George born 1827, Emily 1829, William 1832 and Frederic 1837. William passed his trade down to his son George who also lived at the property after his marriage to Susanna Harriet Poll from North Tuddenham. They had fourteen children, all were born at the cottages. As the family grew up and moved away and business continued to be profitable they aquired shop premises in Mill Street which George's son Frederick took over after his fathers death. The shop is now a Ladies Hairdressers owned by Carol Bandrowska.
 

Courtesy of
Liz & Kevin Keeler
©

An aerial picture showing the row of cottages shown in the last picture, now having been convert into one property (Sunnyside). The Old Coach House of the Methodist Church can clearly be seen, it has since been converted into a meeting room and joined to the church. The land on which it stands was donated by Emily Rosa Horne who owned the cottages in the early 1900's. The purpose of building the stable was for the visiting preachers to rest their horses whilst attending to the church meetings.

Courtesy of
Neville Frewer
©

Opposite the Methodist Church was Nest Field Farm the last owner was Billy Long. Billy was born William Jenison Long in 1905 at Gressenhall the son of William Jenison Long, Landlord of the White Swan at Gressenhall as well as being a Poultry Dealer and his wife Bessie Mary Fisher. Billy married Dorothy Joan Greenwood from Barnham Broom. Billy and Dorothy never had children. Dorothy died in 1978 and Billy moved into 'Tilehurst Nursing Home' (now flats) on Dereham Road Mattishall where he remained until his death in 1987.

 

Courtesy of
Neville Frewer
©

The demolition people move in and the JCB is about to strike the first blow.

 

Courtesy of
The Castle Museum Norwich
©

Whilst preparing the drive of 2 Cedar Rise a hoard of Roman coins showed out of the ground as a workman thrust with his spade at what he thought was a flint.
For more on the Roman Coins found on this site click HERE

 

Courtesy of
Urbin Hawkins
©

Here we have a picture of George Henry Watson (1876), he was born in Scotland. His father, also George (1839) and also from Scotland purchased 'The Cedars 'sometime between 1901 and 1911. The property is situated on Dereham Road and faces Back Lane, it is now known as Madingley. The property was called The Cedars as it had a large cedar tree in its front garden. The tree blew down in a storm. George (snr) had been a farmer and landlord of the Gordon Arms at Orton Lonville Huntington in 1881. He died in 1921 age 81 and was buried on May 11th in the Mattishall Cemetery on Burgh Lane. George (Jnr) married Hannah Grayshon in the Sep quarter of 1927. After George and Hannah married he commissioned Deveny Howard a builder who lived across the road to build them a bungalow east of the Cedars which is still there today, it sits high on the bank. His two sisters stayed living in the family house, see below. George Henry died in 1947 age 74 and was buried in Mattishall Cemetery on May 23rd. The young boy holding the shears is unknown.

 

Courtesy of
Urbin Hawkins
©

A fuller picture of The Cedars and the two Watson spinster sisters Davina Buttar (1876) and Mary (1875) again both born in Scotland. They both remained in the property until their deaths. Davina died in 1955 aged 79 at Newby, Sandleford Hospital and was buried on April 21st in Mattishall Cemetery. Mary also died in 1955 aged 83 and was buried on December 20th also at the Cemetery on Burgh Lane. After their death the house was cleared of all effects and everything was arranged in the back garden and auctioned. The sale was carried out by Case & Dewing of East Dereham, the young John Dewing managed the sale. The house was sold.

 
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